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Banned Products in PNG
As the consumer watchdog in Papua New Guinea, the ICCC has imposed an interim ban on the products listed below. The interim ban as per ICCC Act 2002, will last for a period of 18 months after which a permanent ban may be introduced or at any time a product safety standard may be declared.

1. Small high powered magnets

Small high powered magnets were the first product that the ICCC imposed an interim ban on and it came into effect on the 19th November, 2012. 

 

The danger associated with this product is that teenagers can easily swallow them when they are used as imitation studs.
If swallowed, these magnets can link together inside a child's intestines and clamp onto body tissues, causing intestinal obstructions, perforations, sepsis and even death. Internal damage from magnets can pose serious lifelong health effects.

 

This product has also banned in other countries like Australia, New Zealand and United States of America.
Detailed information is covered in the Gazettal Notice 

2. Toy-like Novelty Cigarette lighters

The Toy-like novelty cigarette lighters were published in the gazette together with the Yo-yo water ball on the 30th May, 2013.


These products are designed to produce a flame that sets cigarettes or other combustible materials alight. These toy-like novelty cigarette lighters look like stylized animals or cartoon characters and are made in typical toy-like sizes and shapes. These novelty lighters create an unresolvable risk of fire; injury and death, in that, children are likely to be attracted to these lighters and may believe them to be toys.

These products are also banned in other countries like: Australia, some States in the United Sates of America and the European Union.

Detailed information is covered in the Gazettal Notice 

These products are designed to produce a flame that sets cigarettes or other combustible materials alight. These toy-like novelty cigarette lighters look like stylized animals or cartoon characters and are made in typical toy-like sizes and shapes.

These novelty lighters create an unresolvable risk of fire; injury and death, in that, children are likely to be attracted to these lighters and may believe them to be toys.

These products are also banned in other countries like: Australia, some States in the United Sates of America and the European Union.

Detailed information is covered in the Gazettal Notice 


3. Yo-yo water balls

An interim ban on Yo-yo water ball was gazetted on the 30th May, 2013.

Yo-yo water balls pose a significant risk of strangulation and adverse reaction if the ball is punctured and the liquid contained within comes into contact with the skin or is swallowed.

This product is also banned in other countries like: Australia, some states in America, Canada and UK.

Detailed information is covered in the Gazettal Notice 

 

Yo-yo water balls pose a significant risk of strangulation and adverse reaction if the ball is punctured and the liquid contained within comes into contact with the skin or is swallowed.

This product is also banned in other countries like: Australia, some states in America, Canada and UK.

Detailed information is covered in the Gazettal Notice 

4. Baby Dummies

The ICCC on the 16th October, 2013 imposed an interim ban on certain baby dummies.


Baby dummies

There is a risk of choking or strangulation associated with certain baby dummies as children under 3 years of age are particularly vulnerable to choking because they have not yet developed the reflex action to cough up objects that lodge in their throats.

Babies can also choke on dummies if dummy shields are too small and do not have ventilation holes.

If it is too small a dummy can get wholly inside a baby’s mouth and block its airway.

Babies can also choke when treats detach from the shields of old or poorly made dummies. The teat can get stuck in a child’s throat and cause suffocation.

Detailed information is covered in the Gazettal Notice 

5. Karicare Infant Formula

The ICCC, on the 14th August 2013, imposed an interim ban on Karicare Infant Formula.

Karicare

On 6th August 2013, Nutricia New Zealand reported on its website that whey proteins were used in its products and may have had residues of the potential contaminated raw material leading to Botulism.

Botulism is a severe, and sometimes fatal, food poisoning caused by eating food infected with the bacterium Clostridium Botulin, which produces botulin toxin. The bacterium grows in food that has been improperly packed in canned foods.

On 26th September 2013, the ICCC revoked the interim ban on Karicare Infant Formula because final test results presented on 28th August 2013 by Nutricia to the Ministry of Primary Industries of New Zealand showed that the Clostridium bacteria present in the three batches of Whey Protein Concentrate (WPC) 80 was Clostridium Sporogenes, a species that does not produce harmful toxins and is a non-pathogenic and therefore does not pose any food safety risk.

Detailed information is covered in the Gazettal Notice